"National Geographic photo of the day: 7th March"
National Geographic’s photo of the day: 7th March

Posted on Friday, March 7th, 2014 and is filed under Travel.

Interior Design Magazines will share with you, as usual, the National Geographic‘s photo of the day. Why? Because National Geographic has the most fantastic pictures of the world. Every single day, the magazine reveals one astonishing photo about people, nature, animals, breathtaking views…the subjects are different but still, National Geographic has the best photos you will ever find.

Keep in touch with “Interior Design Magazines”  and discover the National Geographic‘s photo of the day!

7th March photo

Amazonian Royal Flycatcher – exotic bird photos – “Royal Crest”

Photograph by Andrew Snyder, National Geographic Your Shot

“For the last three years, I have spent my summers conducting biodiversity surveys with a team of other biologists and research assistants in the rain forests of Guyana,” says Your Shot contributor Andrew Snyder, whose picture was featured in the Daily Dozen. “For our bird surveys, we set up a series of mist nets through the understory, and this Amazonian royal flycatcher was one of the birds caught [over the] summer. From previous experience, I knew that this species typically puts on its remarkable crest displays when handled, so while the team was taking their necessary measurements, I was able to make this photograph.”

This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.

"National Geographic photo of the day: 7th March" National Geographic's photo of the day: 7th March National Geographic's photo of the day: 7th March amazonian royal flycatcher 77064Amazonian Royal Flycatcher – exotic bird photos – “Royal Crest”

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Source: National Geographic