"National Geographic photo of the day" 26th March
National Geographic’s photo of the day: 26th March

Posted on Wednesday, March 26th, 2014 and is filed under Travel.

Interior Design Magazines will share with you, as usual, the National Geographic‘s photo of the day. Why? Because National Geographic has the most fantastic pictures of the world. Every single day, the magazine reveals one astonishing photo about people, nature, animals, breathtaking views…the subjects are different but still, National Geographic has the best photos you will ever find.

Keep in touch with “Interior Design Magazines”  and discover the National Geographic‘s photo of the day!

26th March photo

Desertification photos – Calisfornia, USA –  palm trees pictures “Deserted Palms”

Photograph by Bill Brewer, National Geographic Your Shot

“This group of palms was planted as part of a planned real estate project in Lucerne Valley, a small town in the California desert,” says Your Shot member Bill Brewer. “The development failed and years later these dead palms remain. I’ve shot this group of palms a few times, but never at night. [The night I shot this] I was returning home after shooting along old Route 66 and had driven up on these old friends. The palms were lit by a combination of moonlight and a streetlight. The artificial lighting gives the palms a weird glamour.”

Brewer’s picture was recently selected for the Your Shot Daily Dozen.

This photo was submitted to Your Shot. Check out the new and improved website, where you can share photos, take part in assignments, lend your voice to stories, and connect with fellow photographers from around the globe.

"National Geographic photo of the day" 26th March National Geographic's photo of the day: 26th March National Geographic's photo of the day: 26th March desert palms california 77419

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Source: National Geographic